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Showing: 1-10 results of 18

SCENE I. The Royal Gardens in Aranjuez.CARLOS and DOMINGO.DOMINGO.Our pleasant sojourn in AranjuezIs over now, and yet your highness quitsThese joyous scenes no happier than before.Our visit hath been fruitless. Oh, my prince,Break this mysterious and gloomy silence!Open your heart to your own father's heart!A monarch never can too dearly buyThe peace of his own son—his only son.[CARLOS looks on the ground in silence.Is there one dearest... more...

SCENE I. MILLER—MRS. MILLER. MILLER (walking quickly up and down the room). Once for all! The affair is becoming serious. My daughter and the baron will soon be the town-talk—my house lose its character—the president will get wind of it, and—the short and long of the matter is, I'll show the younker the door. MRS MILLER. You did not entice him to your house—did not thrust your daughter upon him! MILLER. Didn't... more...

INTRODUCTION. The special subject of the greater part of the letters and essays of Schiller contained in this volume is Aesthetics; and before passing to any remarks on his treatment of the subject it will be useful to offer a few observations on the nature of this topic, and on its treatment by the philosophical spirit of different ages. First, then, aesthetics has for its object the vast realm of the beautiful, and it may be most adequately... more...

The reason passes, like the heart, through certain epochs and transitions, but its development is not so often portrayed. Men seem to have been satisfied with unfolding the passions in their extremes, their aberration, and their results, without considering how closely they are bound up with the intellectual constitution of the individual. Degeneracy in morals roots in a one-sided and wavering philosophy, doubly dangerous, because it blinds the... more...

SCENE I. A spacious hall, supported on columns, with entrances on both sides;at the back of the stage a large folding-door leading to a chapel.DONNA ISABELLA in mourning; the ELDERS OF MESSINA.ISABELLA.Forth from my silent chamber's deep recesses,Gray Fathers of the State, unwillinglyI come; and, shrinking from your gaze, upliftThe veil that shades my widowed brows: the lightAnd glory of my days is fled forever!And best in solitude and kindred... more...


SCENE I. THE DIET AT CRACOW.On the rising of the curtain the Polish Diet is discovered, seatedin the great senate hall. On a raised platform, elevated by threesteps, and surmounted by a canopy, is the imperial throne, theescutcheons of Poland and Lithuania suspended on each side. The KINGseated upon the throne; on his right and left hand his ten royalofficers standing on the platform. Below the platform the BISHOPS,PALATINES, and CASTELLANS... more...

The present is the best collected edition of the important works of Schiller which is accessible to readers in the English language. Detached poems or dramas have been translated at various times since the first publication of the original works; and in several instances these versions have been incorporated into this collection. Schiller was not less efficiently qualified by nature for an historian than for a dramatist. He was formed to excel in... more...

SCENE I. A common apartment in the Castle of Fotheringay.HANNAH KENNEDY, contending violently with PAULET, who is aboutto break open a closet; DRURY with an iron crown.KENNEDY.How now, sir? what fresh outrage have we here?Back from that cabinet!PAULET.Whence came the jewel?I know 'twas from an upper chamber thrown;And you would bribe the gardener with your trinkets.A curse on woman's wiles! In spite of allMy strict precaution and my active... more...

ACT I. SCENE I. A Saloon in FIESCO'S House. The distant sound of dancing andmusic is heard. LEONORA, masked, and attended by ROSA and ARABELLA, enters hastily. LEONORA (tears off her mask). No more! Not another word! 'Tis as clear as day! (Throwing herself in a chair.) This quite overcomes me—— ARABELLA. My lady! LEONORA (rising.) What, before my eyes! with a notorious coquette! In presence of the whole nobility of Genoa!... more...

SCENE I. Sutlers' tents—in front, a Slop-shop. Soldiers of all colors anduniforms thronging about. Tables all filled. Croats and Hulanscooking at a fire. Sutler-woman serving out wine. Soldier-boysthrowing dice on a drum-head. Singing heard from the tent.Enter a Peasant and his Son.SON.Father, I fear it will come to harm,So let us be off from this soldier swarm;But boist'rous mates will ye find in the shoal—'Twere better to bolt... more...