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Showing: 1-10 results of 1769

CHAPTER I. THE DRAWING BOARD. A Drawing Board should be of soft pine and free from knots, so that it will easily receive the pins or tacks used to fasten down the paper. Its surface should be flat and level, or a little rounding, so that the paper shall lie close to its surface, which is one of the first requisites requisites in making a good drawing. Its edges should be straight and at a right angle one to the other, and the ends of the... more...

Education as a public business It is one of the complaints of the schoolmaster that the public does not defer to his professional opinion as completely as it does to that of practitioners in other professions. At first sight it might seem as though this indicated a defect either in the public or in the profession; and yet a wider view of the situation would suggest that such a conclusion is not a necessary one. The relations of education to the... more...

The story of Alexander Graham Bell's invention of the telephone has been told and retold. How he became involved in the difficult task of making practical phonograph records, and succeeded (in association with Charles Sumner Tainter and Chichester Bell), is not so well known. But material collected through the years by the U. S. National Museum of the Smithsonian Institution now makes clear how Bell and two associates took Edison's tinfoil... more...

Lesson 1. SHORT SOUNDS OF VOWELS. Short Sound of A. am cat gap ban capan bad bag can mapas mad gag fan napat pad hag pan rapax sad lag ran haprat gad tag tan jamsat sap fag van ham Short Sound of E. bed den net sell tentled ken pet nest rentred men set zest sentwed wen yet test wentbeg jet sex pest feltleg let fell rest pelthen met bell jest melt Lesson 2. SHORT SOUNDS OF VOWELS.—CONTINUED. Short Sound of I. if rid him sin jig it... more...

PREFACE. This work, as its title indicates, is intended for the use of Advanced Classes,—for scholars who are, to some extent, familiar with the principles of pronunciation and syllabication. It is not intended to supersede the ordinary Spelling-Book, but rather to follow it, as a practical application of the pupil's knowledge, not only in spelling, but in dividing and pronouncing the more difficult words in common use. It is believed... more...


CHAPTER I Strip by strip there opened out before me, as I climbed the "Thousand Stairs" to the red-roofed Administration Building, the broad panorama of Panama and her bay; below, the city of closely packed roofs and three-topped plazas compressed in a scallop of the sun-gleaming Pacific, with its peaked and wooded islands to far Taboga tilting motionless away to the curve of the earth; behind, the low, irregular jungled hills stretching hazily... more...

ZIONISM Among the persons of the educated classes who follow with any attention all the more important movements of the times, it would now be difficult to find one to whom the word "Zionism" is quite unknown. People are generally aware that it describes an idea and a movement that in the last years has found numerous adherents among the Jews of all countries, but especially among those of the East. Comparatively few, however, both among the... more...

SUCCESSFUL METHODS OF PUBLIC SPEAKING You can acquire valuable knowledge for use in your own public speaking by studying the successful methods of other men. This does not mean, however, that you are to imitate others, but simply to profit by their experience and suggestions in so far as they fit in naturally with your personality. All successful speakers do not speak alike. Each man has found certain things to be effective in his particular... more...

SUCCESS Success—that is the royal road we all want to tread, for the echo off its flagstones sounds pleasantly in the mind. It gives to man all that the natural man desires: the opportunity of exercising his activities to the full; the sense of power; the feeling that life is a slave, not a master; the knowledge that some great industry has quickened into life under the impulse of a single brain. To each his own particular branch of... more...

CHAPTER IThe Universal Need For Sales Knowledge Analysis of Secret of Certain Success The Secret of Certain Success has four principal elements. It comprises: (1) Knowing how to sell (2) The true idea (3) Of one's best capabilities (4) In the right market or field of service. Your success will be in direct proportion to your thorough knowledge and continual use of all four parts of the whole secret. No matter how great your effort, an... more...