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PREFACE. ———— This lesson-book was prepared in order to meet a need realized in my own work as a pastor; a need which is felt by many pastors and workers among the young. In the Home, Sunday-School and Church are children of all ages, from six to sixteen. It is found impracticable to give to all this varied company the same teaching. The lessons that are admirably adapted for boys and girls between ten and fifteen are... more...

IF any of the readers of this book should have the chance to take a railroad ride over the vast region of the United States, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico, they would see a wonderful display of cities and towns, of factories and farms, and a great multitude of men and women actively at work. They would behold, spread out on every side, one of the busiest and happiest lands the sun shines upon.... more...

WHY AND WHEREFORE An ancient writer—I forget his name—declared that in one of the city-states of Greece there was the rule that when any citizen proposed a new law or the repeal of an old one, he should come to the popular assembly with a rope around his neck, and if his proposition failed of adoption, he was to be immediately hanged. It is said that amendments to the constitution of that state were rarely presented, and the people... more...

CHAPTER I THE FIRST SEA FIGHT OF THE REVOLUTION The Burning of the "Gaspee" in Narragansett Bay DOES it not seem an odd fact that little Rhode Island, the smallest of all our states, should have two capital cities, while all the others, some of which would make more than a thousand Rhode Islands, have only one apiece? It is like the old story of the dwarf beating the giants. The tale we have to tell has to do with these two cities, Providence... more...

THE living question in the Sunday school of to-day is that which considers its form of organization. As every good public school at the present time is a graded school, so every first-class Sunday school must be. There can be no efficient, regular, and satisfactory work done in a Sunday school without a system of grade. On this subject there is extensive inquiry, yet general lack of information. The majority of superintendents and teachers have... more...