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Showing: 1-10 results of 40

In this Fifth Reader of the De La Salle Series the plan of the preceding numbers has been continued. The pupil has now mastered the mechanical difficulties of learning to read, and has acquired a fairly good working vocabulary. Hence he is prepared to read intelligently and with some degree of fluency and pleasure. Now is the time to lead him to acquire a taste for good reading. The selections have been drawn mainly from authors whose writings... more...

LESSON XLVI NEW WORDS. so bath sick please tub wrap shawl sis'ter Now, Ned, please do not put my kitty into the bath tub. Yes, sister, I must give her a bath. Here is the bath tub with some nice warm water. But, Ned, kitty will get sick if you put her into the water. She will take cold.   No, I will wrap her well in the big shawl, and then she can not take cold. So Ned gave kitty a bath, and then put her into the nice... more...

TO PRECEPTORS. With learning may laughter be found; "'Tis good to be merry and wise;" To gayly get over the ground, As higher and higher we rise. Some children their letters may learn, While others will surely do more, As the subjects suggestively turn To matters not thought of before. Descriptions and pictures combined Are here made attractive and clear; So suited that children may find From error the truth to appear.... more...

PHILEMON AND BAUCIS   I Long ago, on a high hill in Greece, Philemon and Baucis lived. They were poor, but they were never unhappy. They had many hives of bees from which they got honey, and many vines from which they gathered grapes. One old cow gave them all the milk that they could use, and they had a little field in which grain was raised. The old couple had as much as they needed, and were always ready to share whatever they had... more...

Our Best Friend IN A log cabin in the mountains lived a little boy. He often played near the house, but did not go far away. Near the house were many trees and rocks and among these wild animals stayed.   DOWN BY THE SPRING One day the boy missed his mama and thought he would try to find her. He went down the path toward the spring, where he had often gone after water. He went on and on. Finally he wished to return, but did not know the... more...


This elementary history of Greece is intended for supplementary reading or as a first history text-book for young pupils. It is therefore made up principally of stories about persons; for, while history proper is largely beyond the comprehension of children, they are able at an early age to understand and enjoy anecdotes of people, especially of those in the childhood of civilization. At the same time, these stories will give a clear idea of the... more...

KING ALFRED AND THE CAKES.   Many years ago there lived in Eng-land a wise and good king whose name was Al-fred. No other man ever did so much for his country as he; and people now, all over the world, speak of him as Alfred the Great. In those days a king did not have a very easy life. There was war almost all the time, and no one else could lead his army into battle so well as he. And so, between ruling and fighting, he had a busy time... more...

LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD PERSONS IN THE PLAY—Little Red Riding-Hood, Mother, Bird, Wolf, Miller, Grandmother Scene I.—At Red Riding-Hood's Home Mother. Would you like to go to grandmother's to-day, my child? The sun is bright and the air is warm and pleasant. Little Red Riding-Hood. Yes, mother, you know I always like to visit dear grandmamma. Mother. Then you may go. You may carry your little basket, and I'll put some honey and a... more...

The Home Coming Tom was to arrive early in the afternoon, and there was another fluttering heart besides Maggie's when it was late enough for the sound of the gig wheels to be expected. For if Mrs. Tulliver had a strong feeling, it was fondness for her boy. At last the sound came—that quick light bowling of the gig wheels. "There he is, my sweet lad!" Mrs. Tulliver stood with her arms open; Maggie jumped first on one leg and then on the... more...

"I'M GOING TO."— PART I. Once upon a time, there was a little boy, whose name was Johnny. "Johnny," said his mamma, one day, "will you bring me an armful of wood?" "Yes," said Johnny, "I'm going to"; but just then he heard Carlo, the dog, barking at a chipmunk over in the meadow, so he ran off as fast as he could go. Now this was not the first time that Johnny had said to his mamma, "Yes, I'm going to." He never thought of that wood... more...