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Showing: 341-348 results of 348

ACT I. [Enter William the Conqueror; Marques Lubeck, with a picture;Mountney; Manville; Valingford; and Duke Dirot.] MARQUES.What means fair Britain's mighty ConquerorSo suddenly to cast away his staff,And all in passion to forsake the tylt?D. DIROT.My Lord, this triumph we solemnise hereIs of mere love to your increasing joys,Only expecting cheerful looks for all;What sudden pangs than moves your majestyTo dim the brightness of the day with... more...

INTRODUCTION THE greatest of English dramatists except Shakespeare, the first literary dictator and poet-laureate, a writer of verse, prose, satire, and criticism who most potently of all the men of his time affected the subsequent course of English letters: such was Ben Jonson, and as such his strong personality assumes an interest to us almost unparalleled, at least in his age. Ben Jonson came of the stock that was centuries after to give to... more...

ACT I SCENE I.—Soldiers and Citizens (with cross-bows) Jetter (steps forward, and bends his cross-bow). Soest, Buyck, Ruysum Soest. Come, shoot away, and have done with it! You won't beat me! Three black rings, you never made such a shot in all your life. And so I'm master for this year. Jetter. Master and king to boot; who envies you? You'll have to pay double reckoning; 'tis only fair you should pay for your dexterity. Buyck. Jetter,... more...

EDWARD THE SECOND By Christopher Marlowe DRAMATIS PERSONAE KING EDWARD THE SECOND.PRINCE EDWARD, his son, afterwards KING EDWARD THE THIRD.KENT, brother to KING EDWARD THE SECOND.GAVESTON.ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY.BISHOP OF COVENTRY.BISHOP OF WINCHESTER.WARWICK.LANCASTER.PEMBROKE.ARUNDER.LEICESTER.BERKELEY.MORTIMER the elder.MORTIMER the younger, his nephew.SPENSER the elder.SPENSER the younger, his... more...

Act I. A Representation at the Hotel de Bourgogne. The hall of the Hotel de Bourgogne, in 1640. A sort of tennis-court arranged and decorated for a theatrical performance. The hall is oblong and seen obliquely, so that one of its sides forms the back of the right foreground, and meeting the left background makes an angle with the stage, which is partly visible. On both sides of the stage are benches. The curtain is composed of two tapestries... more...


ACT I. SCENE I. [1st Cut.] [2nd Grooves.] A Lane near a Village. Afternoon. Enter ARTHUR WALTON and WILLIAM, R.S.E. Arthur. Give me your arm, my feet tread heavily;The sameness of this scene doth pierce my heartWith thronging recollections of the past.There is nought chang'd—and what a world of care,Of sorrow, passion, pleasure have I known,Since but a natural part of this was I,Whose voice is now a discord to the soundsOnce daily... more...

THE CHARACTERS GODS:MADANA (Eros).VASANTA (Lycoris).MORTALS:CHITRA, daughter of the King of Manipur.ARJUNA, a prince of the house of the Kurus. He is of theKshatriya or "warrior caste," and during the action is living asa Hermit retired in the forest.VILLAGERS from an outlying district of Manipur.NOTE.—The dramatic poem "Chitra" has been performed in Indiawithout scenery—the actors being surrounded by the audience.Proposals for its... more...

Four of the five ensuing Plays belong to a peculiar class of our early dramatic performances never yet especially noticed, nor sufficiently illustrated. Many specimens have of late years been printed, and reprinted, of Miracle-plays, of Moral-plays, and of productions written in the most matured period of our dramatic literature; but little or nothing has been done to afford information respecting a species of stage-representation which... more...