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Showing: 1-10 results of 106

ACTVS PRIMVS. [Prologue] Enter the GHOAST OF ANDREA, and with him REUENGE.GHOAST. When this eternall substance of my souleDid liue imprisond in my wanton flesh,Ech in their function seruing others need,I was a courtier in the Spanish court:My name was Don Andrea; my discent,Though not ignoble, yet inferiour farTo gratious fortunes of my tender youth,For there, in prime and pride of all my yeeres,By duteous seruice and deseruing loue,In... more...

ACT IV SCENE I.   Cyprus.  Before the Castle. [Enter Othello and Iago.] IAGOWill you think so?OTHELLO                              Think so, Iago?IAGO                     ... more...

ACT  V SCENE  I.   The Forest of Arden [Enter TOUCHSTONE and AUDREY.] TOUCHSTONEWe shall find a time, Audrey; patience, gentle Audrey.AUDREYFaith, the priest was good enough, for all the old gentleman's saying.TOUCHSTONEA most wicked Sir Oliver, Audrey, a most vile Martext. But, Audrey, there is a youth here in the forest lays claim to you.AUDREYAy, I know who 'tis: he hath no interest in me in the world: here comes... more...

FAUST.     Night. In a narrow high-arched Gothic room,    FAUST sitting uneasy at his desk. Faust. Have now, alas! quite studied throughPhilosophy and Medicine,And Law, and ah! Theology, too,With hot desire the truth to win!And here, at last, I stand, poor fool!As wise as when I entered school;Am called Magister, Doctor, indeed,—Ten livelong years cease not to leadBackward and forward, to and fro,My... more...

WASTE At Shapters, George Farrant's house in Hertfordshire. Ten o'clock on a Sunday evening in summer. Facing you at her piano by the window, from which she is protected by a little screen, sits Mrs. Farrant; a woman of the interesting age, clear-eyed and all her face serene, except for a little pucker of the brows which shows a puzzled mind upon some important matters. To become almost an ideal hostess has been her achievement; and in her own... more...


ACT I. On a ship at sea: a tempestuous noise of thunder and lightning heard.   Mast. Boatswain! Boats. Here, master: what cheer? Mast. speak to the mariners: fall to’t, yarely, or we run ourselves aground: bestir, bestir. Exit. Enter Mariners. 5 Boats. Heigh, my hearts! cheerly, cheerly, my hearts! yare, yare! Take in the topsail. Tend to the master’s whistle. Blow, , if room enough! Alonso, Sebastian, Antonio,... more...

REMARKS. There seems to be required by a number of well meaning persons of the present day a degree of moral perfection in a play, which few literary works attain; and in which sermons, and other holy productions, are at times deficient, though written with the purest intention. To criticise any book, besides the present drama, was certainly not a premeditated design in writing this little essay; but in support of the position—that every... more...

SCENE I. A room fitted up for astrological labors, and provided withcelestial charts, with globes, telescopes, quadrants, and othermathematical instruments. Seven colossal figures, representing theplanets, each with a transparent star of different color on itshead, stand in a semicircle in the background, so that Mars andSaturn are nearest the eye. The remainder of the scene and itsdisposition is given in the fourth scene of the second act.... more...

Excuse me, sirs, I pray—I can't yet speak—I'm crying now—and have been all the week."'Tis not alone this mourning suit," good masters:"I've that within"—for which there are no plasters!Pray, would you know the reason why I'm crying?The Comic Muse, long sick, is now a-dying!And if she goes, my tears will never stop;For as a player, I can't squeeze out one drop:I am undone, that's all—shall lose my bread—I'd... more...

by Moliere
PROLOGUE.   The front of the stage represents a rustic spot, while at the back the sea can be seen in the distance.   SCENE I. Flora. appears in the centre of the stage, attended by Vertumnus, god of trees and fruit, and by Palemon, god of the streams. Each of these gods conducts a troup of divinities; one leads in his train Dryads and Sylvans, and the other River Gods and Naiads. Flora sings the following lines, to invite Venus... more...