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Page 15 CHAPTER I THE BEGINNINGS OF NAVIES Civilization and sea power arose from the Mediterranean, and the progress of recent archeological research has shown that civilizations and empires had been reared in the Mediterranean on sea power long before the dawn of history. Since the records of Egypt are far better preserved than those of any other nation of antiquity, and the discovery of the Rosetta stone has made it possible to read them, we... more...

INTRODUCTION. The fifth part of a century almost has sped with the flight of time since the outbreak of the Slaveholder's Rebellion against the United States. The young men of to-day were then babes in their cradles, or, if more than that, too young to be appalled by the terror of the times. Those now graduating from our schools of learning to be teachers of youth and leaders of public thought, if they are ever prepared to teach the history of... more...

FOREWORD By the Editor of "The Bystander."   HEN Tommy went out to the great war, he went smiling, and singing the latest ditty of the halls. The enemy scowled. War, said his professors of kultur and his hymnsters of hate, could never be waged in the Tipperary spirit, and the nation that sent to the front soldiers who sang and laughed must be the very decadent England they had all along denounced as unworthy of world-power. I fear the... more...


CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY The following pages are intended to give an account of personal experience of the gunshot wounds observed during the South African campaign in 1899 and 1900. For this reason few cases are quoted beyond those coming under my own immediate observation, and in the few instances where others are made use of the source of quotation is indicated. It will be noted that my experience was almost entirely confined to bullet wounds,... more...


PART I CHASING THE REBELS SECTION I KEMP AND BEYERS Six weeks after the war-cloud smashed over Europe a man called on me. He was an old friend; but the point about him is that at that particular time I fancied him on his farm at least a thousand miles away. "Hello!" I said in surprise. "Why this sudden appearance?" "This is going to be a big thing, my boy. I am off 'Home.' They will need us all." It impressed me. He was a person calm and... more...

I. THE PRISON GATES. The English-speaking public is generally well informed concerning the part played in the war by the Belgian troops. The resistance of our small field army at Liège, before Antwerp, and on the Yser has been praised and is still being praised wherever the tale runs. This is easy enough to understand. The fact that those 100,000 men should have been able to hold so long in check the forces of the first military Empire... more...

PREPARATIONS FOR AN OFFENSIVE During the greater part of the winter of 1914-15, the fighting along the western front had been almost constant, but had resulted in little that either side could justly assert to be a success. The rigors inevitable in such a mode of warfare had become almost beyond human endurance, and commanders on both sides looked forward to a more active campaign. An immense amount of ammunition had been stored by the French... more...

CHAPTER I EVENTS LEADING UP TO THE SIEGE OF LADYSMITH 1899 On returning from the North-West Frontier of India at the close of the Tirah Expedition, 1897-8, the 1st Battalion Devonshire Regiment, which had served with distinction under the command of Colonel J.H. Yule in the campaign against the Afridi clans, was ordered to proceed from Peshawar to Jullunder, at which place it was quartered in 1898 and in the summer months of 1899, during which... more...

THE FIGHT OFF CAPE ST. VINCENT THE SCEPTRE OF THE SEA. "Old England's sons are English yet,Old England's hearts are strong;And still she wears her coronetAflame with sword and song.As in their pride our fathers died,If need be, so die we;So wield we still, gainsay who will,The sceptre of the sea. We've Raleighs still for Raleigh's part,We've Nelsons yet unknown;The pulses of the Lion-HeartBeat on through Wellington.Hold, Britain, hold thy... more...