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Showing: 31-40 results of 60

CHAPTER I. A Matter of Importance IN THAT part of the celebrated parish of St. George which is bounded on one side by Piccadilly and on the other by Curzon Street, is a district of a peculiar character. 'Tis cluster of small streets of little houses, frequently intersected by mews, which here are numerous, and sometimes gradually, rather than abruptly, terminating in a ramification of those mysterious regions. Sometimes a group of courts... more...

INTRODUCTION SOME MOVEMENTS OF THOUGHT IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY WHICH HAVE AFFECTED CHRISTIAN BELIEFS When King Solomon's Temple was a-building, we are told that the stone was made ready at the quarry, "and there was neither hammer nor axe nor any tool of iron heard in the house." The structures of intellectual beliefs which Christians have reared in the various centuries to house their religious faith have been built, for the most part, out... more...

RUDIMENTAL DIVINESCIENCE How would you define Christian Science?                         1AS the law of God, the law of good, interpreting anddemonstrating the divine Principle and rule of                  3universal harmony.What is the Principle of Christian Science?It is God, the Supreme Being, infinite and immortal   ... more...

How would you define Christian Science? As the law of God, the law of good, interpreting and demonstrating the divine Principle and rule of universal harmony. What is the Principle of Christian Science? It is God, the Supreme Being, infinite and immortal Mind, the Soul of man and the universe. It is our Father which is in heaven. It is substance, Spirit, Life, Truth, and Love,—these are the deific Principle. Do you mean by this... more...

ANCESTRAL SHADOWS My ancestors, according to the flesh, were from both Scotland and England, my great-grandfather, on my father's side, being John McNeil of Edinburgh. His wife, my great-grandmother, was Marion Moor, and her family is said to have been in some way related to Hannah More, the pious and popular English authoress of a century ago. I remember reading, in my childhood, certain manuscripts containing Scriptural sonnets, besides... more...


REASON AND FAITH; THEIR CLAIMS AND CONFLICTS. [by Henry Rogers] THE EDINBURGH REVIEW, OCTOBER, 1849. [Volume 90] No. CLXXXII. [Pages 293-356] Art.I—1. Historic Doubts relative to Napoleon Buonaparte Eighthedition, pp. 60. 8vo. London. 2. The Nemesis of Faith. By J. A. Froude,M. A., Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford. 12mo. London: pp. 227. 3.Popular Christianity, its Transition State and Probable Development. ByF. J. Foxton, B. A.;... more...

The Purpose in Jesus' Coming God Spelling Himself out in Jesus. Jesus is God spelling Himself out in language that man can understand. God and man used to talk together freely. But one day man went away from God. And then he went farther away. He left home. He left his native land, Eden, where he lived with God. He emigrated from God. And through going away he lost his mother-tongue. A language always changes away from its native land. Through... more...

PULPIT AND PRESS DEDICATORY SERMON By Rev. Mary Baker Eddy First Pastor of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston, Mass. Delivered January 6, 1895 Text: They shall be abundantly satisfied with the fatness of Thy house; and Thou shall make them drink of the river of Thy pleasures.—Psalms xxxvi. 8. A new year is a nursling, a babe of time, a prophecy and promise clad in white raiment, kissed—and encumbered with... more...

CHAPTER I. THE HUMANHEARTEDNESS OF JESUS.   O God, O kinsman loved, but not enough,    O man with eyes majestic after death,  Whose feet have toiled along our pathways rough,    Whose lips drawn human breath;   By that one likeness which is ours and thine,    By that one nature which doth hold us kin,  By that high heaven where sinless thou dost... more...

(AUGUST, 1919) The Essays in this volume were written at various times before and during the Great War. In reading them through for republication, I have to ask myself whether my opinions on social science and on the state of religion, the two subjects which are mainly dealt with in this collection, have been modified by the greatest calamity which has ever befallen the civilised world, or by the issue of the struggle. I find very little that I... more...