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Showing: 11-20 results of 1769

Entire Sanctification as Taught by John. John, before Pentecost, was emphatically a Son of Thunder. He could forbid a man to cast out devils in the name of Jesus, because the man was not of his own particular fold. He was ready to imitate Elijah by calling down fire from heaven to destroy the Samaritans who would not extend the rites of hospitality to his Master. He was eager to have the highest possible place in the coming kingdom of his Lord,... more...

DETAILS OF TREATMENT. For forty-eight hours after admission to the hospital the patient is kept on ordinary diet, to determine the severity of his diabetes. Then he is starved, and no food allowed save whiskey and black coffee. The whiskey is given in the coffee: 1 ounce of whiskey every two hours, from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. This furnishes roughly about 800 calories. The whiskey is not an essential part of the treatment; it merely furnishes a few... more...

THE CALIFORNIA PIONEER SOCIETY. The California Pioneer Society was organized in August, 1850. The photograph of their building appears on the cover of this book, W.D.M. Howard was their first president. Among their early presidents, and prominent in the days of Forty-niners, were Samuel Branan, Thomas Larkins, Wm. D. Farewell, and James Lick—who liberally endowed it.   It was organized for the purpose of perpetuating the memory of... more...

I. THE MEDICAL MISTAKE A book of modern social inquiry has a shape that is somewhat sharply defined. It begins as a rule with an analysis, with statistics, tables of population, decrease of crime among Congregationalists, growth of hysteria among policemen, and similar ascertained facts; it ends with a chapter that is generally called "The Remedy." It is almost wholly due to this careful, solid, and scientific method that "The Remedy" is never... more...

VILLAGE IMPROVEMENTS. It may be because the newness of our country and the fragile character of our early structures have prevented the accumulation of inferior, ugly, and uncomfortable houses, as the nucleus around which later building has crystallized; it may be from circumstances which have prevented the isolated residence of the better classes of our people; or it may be the result of accident. Whatever the reason, it is beyond dispute that... more...


ON THE SUFFERINGS OF THE WORLD. Unless suffering is the direct and immediate object of life, our existence must entirely fail of its aim. It is absurd to look upon the enormous amount of pain that abounds everywhere in the world, and originates in needs and necessities inseparable from life itself, as serving no purpose at all and the result of mere chance. Each separate misfortune, as it comes, seems, no doubt, to be something exceptional; but... more...

I. VENTILATION AND WARMING. [Sidenote: First rule of nursing, to keep the air within as pure as the air without.] The very first canon of nursing, the first and the last thing upon which a nurse's attention must be fixed, the first essential to a patient, without which all the rest you can do for him is as nothing, with which I had almost said you may leave all the rest alone, is this: TO KEEP THE AIR HE BREATHES AS PURE AS THE EXTERNAL AIR,... more...

INTRODUCTION "Come now and let us reason together, saith the Lord."—Isaiah. "If any man willeth to do his will, he shall know of the teaching, whether it is of God, or whether I speak from my self."—Jesus. "And ye shall seek me and find me when ye shall search for me with all your heart."—Jeremiah. "Then shall we know if we follow on to know the Lord."—Hosea. This work is not written for sceptics; yet while... more...

EDITOR'S PREFACE Needlework, which is still practised traditionally in every house, was once a splendid art, an art in which English workers were especially famous, so that, early in the XIIIth century, vestments embroidered in England were eagerly accepted in Rome, and the kind of work wrought here was known over Europe as "English Work." Embroideries façon d'Angleterre often occupy the first place in foreign inventories. At Durham are... more...

THE CLEVER KID TIME: this morning.PLACE: a pasture. GRAY WOLF.WHITE WOLF.KID. [The GRAY WOLF and the WHITE WOLF are standing at the foot of a hill; at the top of the hill is a KID.] GRAY WOLF. Look, brother, there is a kid! WHITE WOLF. Where? Where? GRAY WOLF. On that hill to the south. WHITE WOLF. I do not see her. GRAY WOLF. She is on the very top. WHITE WOLF. Ah, now I see her! GRAY WOLF. I wish we could get at... more...