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Showing: 11-20 results of 27

Far from punishing the Corticelli by making her live with Redegonde, the Count d'Aglie seemed to have encouraged her; and I was not sorry for it, since as long as she did not trouble me any more I did not care how many lovers she had. She had become a great friend of Redegonde's, and did exactly as she pleased, for their duenna was much more easy going than the Pacienza. Nobody knew of the trick which Lord Percy had played me, and I took care to... more...

My Stay at Paris and My Departure for Strasburg, Where I Find theRenaud—My Misfortunes at Munich and My Sad Visit to Augsburg At ten o'clock in the morning, cheered by the pleasant feeling of being once more in that Paris which is so imperfect, but which is the only true town in the world, I called on my dear Madame d'Urfe, who received me with open arms. She told me that the young Count d'Aranda was quite well, and if I liked she would... more...

Cardinal Passianei—The Pope—Masiuccia—I Arrive At Naples Cardinal Passionei received me in a large hall where he was writing. He begged me to wait till he had finished, but he could not ask me to take a seat as he occupied the only chair that his vast room contained. When he had put down his pen, he rose, came to me, and after informing me that he would tell the Holy Father of my visit, he added,— "My brother Cornaro... more...

The Play—The Russian—Petri—Rosalie at the Convent When the marquis had gone, seeing Rosalie engaged with Veronique, I set myself to translate the 'Ecossaise' for the actors at Genoa, who seemed pretty good ones, to play. I thought Rosalie looking sad at dinner, and said, "What is the matter, dearest? You know I do not like to see you looking melancholy." "I am vexed at Veronique's being prettier than I." "I see what you... more...

The Door—Keeper's Daughters—The Horoscopes—Mdlle. Roman The idea of the sorry plight in which I had left the Marquis de Prie, his mistress, and perhaps all the company, who had undoubtedly coveted the contents of my cash-box, amused me till I reached Chamberi, where I only stopped to change horses. When I reached Grenoble, where I intended to stay a week, I did not find my lodging to my liking, and went in my carriage to the... more...


M. de Voltaire; My Discussions with That Great Man—Ariosto—The Duc deVillars—The Syndic and the Three Girls—Dispute withVoltaire—Aix-en-Savoie—The Marquis Desarmoises "M. de Voltaire," said I, "this is the happiest moment of my life. I have been your pupil for twenty years, and my heart is full of joy to see my master." "Honour me with your attendance on my course for twenty years more, and promise me that... more...

I Resolve to Become a Monk—I go to Confession—Delay of aFortnight—Giustiniani, the Apostle Capuchin—I Alter my Mind; MyReasons—My Pranks at the Inn—I Dine With the Abbot The cool way in which the abbot told these cock-and-bull stories gave me an inclination to laughter, which the holiness of the place and the laws of politeness had much difficulty in restraining. All the same I listened with such an attentive... more...

The so-called Countess Piccolomini was a fine example of the adventurers. She was young, tall, well-made, had eyes full of fire, and skin of a dazzling whiteness; not, however, that natural whiteness which delights those who know the value of a satin skin and rose petals, but rather that artificial fairness which is commonly to be seen at Rome on the faces of courtezans, and which disgusts those who know how it is produced. She had also splendid... more...

My Fortune in Holland—My Return to Paris with Young Pompeati Amongst the letters which were waiting for me was one from the comptroller-general, which advised me that twenty millions in Government securities had been placed in the hands of M. d'Afri, who was not to go beyond a loss of eight per cent.; and another letter from my good patron, M. de Bernis, telling me to do the best I could, and to be assured that the ambassador would be... more...

CHAPTER I Count Tiretta of Trevisa Abbe Coste—Lambertini, the Pope's Niece HerNick—Name for Tiretta The Aunt and Niece—Our Talk by theFireside—Punishment of Damien—Tiretta's Mistake Anger ofMadame***—Their Reconciliation—My Happiness with Mdlle. de la MeureSilvia's Daughter—Mdlle, de la Meure Marries My Despair and Jealousy—AChange far the Better In the beginning of March, 1757, I received a... more...