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I Renounce the Clerical Profession, and Enter the MilitaryService—Therese Leaves for Naples, and I Go to Venice—I Am AppointedEnsign in the Army of My Native Country—I Embark for Corfu, and Land atOrsera to Take a Walk I had been careful, on my arrival in Bologna, to take up my quarters at a small inn, so as not to attract any notice, and as soon as I had dispatched my letters to Therese and the... more...

The so-called Countess Piccolomini was a fine example of the adventurers. She was young, tall, well-made, had eyes full of fire, and skin of a dazzling whiteness; not, however, that natural whiteness which delights those who know the value of a satin skin and rose petals, but rather that artificial fairness which is commonly to be seen at Rome on the faces of courtezans, and which disgusts those who... more...

Countess Coronini—A Lover's Pique—Reconciliation—The First Meeting—APhilosophical Parenthesis My beautiful nun had not spoken to me, and I was glad of it, for I was so astonished, so completely under the spell of her beauty, that I might have given her a very poor opinion of my intelligence by the rambling answers which I should very likely have given to her questions. I knew her to be... more...

Far from punishing the Corticelli by making her live with Redegonde, the Count d'Aglie seemed to have encouraged her; and I was not sorry for it, since as long as she did not trouble me any more I did not care how many lovers she had. She had become a great friend of Redegonde's, and did exactly as she pleased, for their duenna was much more easy going than the Pacienza. Nobody knew of the... more...

CHAPTER I Leave Bologna a Happy Man—The Captain Parts from Us in Reggio, where ISpend a Delightful Night with Henriette—Our Arrival in Parma—HenrietteResumes the Costume of a Woman; Our Mutual Felicity—I Meet SomeRelatives of Mine, but Do not Discover Myself The reader can easily guess that there was a change as sudden as a transformation in a pantomime, and that the short but magic sentence,... more...

My Fortune in Holland—My Return to Paris with Young Pompeati Amongst the letters which were waiting for me was one from the comptroller-general, which advised me that twenty millions in Government securities had been placed in the hands of M. d'Afri, who was not to go beyond a loss of eight per cent.; and another letter from my good patron, M. de Bernis, telling me to do the best I could, and to... more...

Cardinal Passianei—The Pope—Masiuccia—I Arrive At Naples Cardinal Passionei received me in a large hall where he was writing. He begged me to wait till he had finished, but he could not ask me to take a seat as he occupied the only chair that his vast room contained. When he had put down his pen, he rose, came to me, and after informing me that he would tell the Holy Father of my visit, he... more...

Supper at My Casino With M. M. and M. de Bernis, the French Ambassador—AProposal from M. M.; I Accept It—Consequences—C. C. is Unfaithful toMe, and I Cannot Complain I felt highly pleased with the supper-party I had arranged with M—— M——, and I ought to have been happy. Yet I was not so; but whence came the anxiety which was a torment to me? Whence? From my fatal habit of gambling. That... more...

I Am Ordered to Leave Vienna—The Empress Moderates but Does Not Annul the Order—Zavoiski at Munich—My Stay at Augsburg—Gasconnade at Louisburg—The Cologne Newspaper—My Arrival at Aix-la-Chapelle The greatest mistake a man that punishes a knave can commit is to leave the said rogue alive, for he is certain to take vengeance. If I had had my sword in the den of thieves, I should no doubt have... more...

My Stay at Paris and My Departure for Strasburg, Where I Find theRenaud—My Misfortunes at Munich and My Sad Visit to Augsburg At ten o'clock in the morning, cheered by the pleasant feeling of being once more in that Paris which is so imperfect, but which is the only true town in the world, I called on my dear Madame d'Urfe, who received me with open arms. She told me that the young Count... more...