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The Memoirs of Casanova, though they have enjoyed the popularity of a bad reputation, have never had justice done to them by serious students of literature, of life, and of history. One English writer, indeed, Mr. Havelock Ellis, has realised that 'there are few more delightful books in the world,' and he has analysed them in an essay on Casanova, published in Affirmations, with extreme care... more...

Slight Misfortunes Compel Me to Leave Venice—My Adventures in Milan andMantua On Low Sunday Charles paid us a visit with his lovely wife, who seemed totally indifferent to what Christine used to be. Her hair dressed with powder did not please me as well as the raven black of her beautiful locks, and her fashionable town attire did not, in my eyes, suit her as well as her rich country dress. But the... more...

My Misfortunes in Chiozza—Father Stephano—The Lazzaretto at Ancona—TheGreek Slave—My Pilgrimage to Our Lady of Loretto—I Go to Rome on Foot,and From Rome to Naples to Meet the Bishop—I Cannot Join Him—Good LuckOffers Me the Means of Reaching Martorano, Which Place I Very QuicklyLeave to Return to Naples The retinue of the ambassador, which was styled "grand," appeared to me very... more...

I Renounce the Clerical Profession, and Enter the MilitaryService—Therese Leaves for Naples, and I Go to Venice—I Am AppointedEnsign in the Army of My Native Country—I Embark for Corfu, and Land atOrsera to Take a Walk I had been careful, on my arrival in Bologna, to take up my quarters at a small inn, so as not to attract any notice, and as soon as I had dispatched my letters to Therese and the... more...

Countess Coronini—A Lover's Pique—Reconciliation—The First Meeting—APhilosophical Parenthesis My beautiful nun had not spoken to me, and I was glad of it, for I was so astonished, so completely under the spell of her beauty, that I might have given her a very poor opinion of my intelligence by the rambling answers which I should very likely have given to her questions. I knew her to be... more...

CHAPTER I Leave Bologna a Happy Man—The Captain Parts from Us in Reggio, where ISpend a Delightful Night with Henriette—Our Arrival in Parma—HenrietteResumes the Costume of a Woman; Our Mutual Felicity—I Meet SomeRelatives of Mine, but Do not Discover Myself The reader can easily guess that there was a change as sudden as a transformation in a pantomime, and that the short but magic sentence,... more...

CHAPTER I Count Tiretta of Trevisa Abbe Coste—Lambertini, the Pope's Niece HerNick—Name for Tiretta The Aunt and Niece—Our Talk by theFireside—Punishment of Damien—Tiretta's Mistake Anger ofMadame***—Their Reconciliation—My Happiness with Mdlle. de la MeureSilvia's Daughter—Mdlle, de la Meure Marries My Despair and Jealousy—AChange far the Better In the beginning of... more...

My Fortune in Holland—My Return to Paris with Young Pompeati Amongst the letters which were waiting for me was one from the comptroller-general, which advised me that twenty millions in Government securities had been placed in the hands of M. d'Afri, who was not to go beyond a loss of eight per cent.; and another letter from my good patron, M. de Bernis, telling me to do the best I could, and to... more...

Under The Leads—The Earthquake What a strange and unexplained power certain words exercise upon the soul! I, who the evening before so bravely fortified myself with my innocence and courage, by the word tribunal was turned to a stone, with merely the faculty of passive obedience left to me. My desk was open, and all my papers were on a table where I was accustomed to write. "Take them," said... more...

Supper at My Casino With M. M. and M. de Bernis, the French Ambassador—AProposal from M. M.; I Accept It—Consequences—C. C. is Unfaithful toMe, and I Cannot Complain I felt highly pleased with the supper-party I had arranged with M—— M——, and I ought to have been happy. Yet I was not so; but whence came the anxiety which was a torment to me? Whence? From my fatal habit of gambling. That... more...

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