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Showing: 51-60 results of 1769

CHAPTER I. THOUGHTS ON THE RENAISSANCE. It seems to be a law of nature that progress, as well as time, should be marked by periods of alternate light and darkness—day and night. This law is nowhere more apparent than in the history of Art. Three times has the world been illuminated by the full brilliance of Art, and three times has a corresponding period of darkness ensued. The first day dawned in Egypt and Assyria, and its works lie... more...

LESSON I. THE ASTRAL SENSES. The student of occultism usually is quite familiar with the crass individual who assumes the cheap skeptical attitude toward occult matters, which attitude he expresses in his would-be "smart" remark that he "believes only in what his senses perceive." He seems to think that his cheap wit has finally disposed of the matter, the implication being that the occultist is a credulous, "easy" person who believes in the... more...

THE ANALECTS BOOK I On Learning—Miscellaneous Sayings:— "To learn," said the Master, "and then to practise opportunely what one has learnt—does not this bring with it a sense of satisfaction? "To have associates in study coming to one from distant parts—does not this also mean pleasure in store? "And are not those who, while not comprehending all that is said, still remain not unpleased to hear, men of the superior... more...

DEFINITION OF THE ART OF ENGRAVING. 1. The entrance on my duty for to-day begins the fourth year of my official work in Oxford; and I doubt not that some of my audience are asking themselves, very doubtfully—at all events, I ask myself, very anxiously—what has been done. For practical result, I have not much to show. I announced, a fortnight since, that I would meet, the day before yesterday, any gentleman who wished to attend this... more...

THE OUTLOOK FOR THE GROWING OF APPLES The apple has long been the most popular of our tree fruits, but the last few years have seen a steady growth in its appreciation and use. This is probably due in a large measure to a better knowledge of its value and to the development of new methods of preparation for consumption. Few fruits can be utilized in as many ways as can the apple. In addition to the common use of the fresh fruit out of hand and... more...


AN INQUIRY, &c. &c. The deviation of Man from the state in which he was originally placed by Nature seems to have proved to him a prolific source of Diseases. From the love of splendour, from the indulgences of luxury, and from his fondness for amusement, he has familiarised himself with a great number of animals, which may not originally have been intended for his associates. The Wolf, disarmed of ferocity, is now pillowed in the... more...

YOUNG AMERIGO AND HIS FAMILY 1451-1470 Cradled in the valley of the Arno, its noble architecture fitly supplementing its numerous natural charms, lies the Tuscan city of Florence, the birthplace of immortal Dante, the early home of Michael Angelo, the seat of the Florentine Medici, the scene of Savonarola's triumphs and his tragic end. Fame has come to many sons of Florence, as poets, statesmen, sculptors, painters, travellers; but perhaps none... more...

ADENOIDS Nature intends that we should breathe through the nose and has so arranged matters that the air is strained, warmed, and moistened as it passes through the nose. This is very important. Unfortunately about 10 per cent of all children have adenoids which interfere with free breathing through the nose. So many serious results follow this condition that parents should learn something about adenoids and their treatment. WHAT ARE... more...

The emotion of love between the sexes has as yet received no thorough scientific treatment. No writer so far as I can find has treated it from a genetic standpoint. The literature upon the subject is therefore meager. In his recent treatise upon “The Psychology of the Emotions,” Ribot remarks: “The sex-instinct, the last in chronological order with man and the higher animals, gives rise to the emotion of love with its numerous... more...

I trust that you will pardon me for being here. I do not wish to force my thoughts upon you, but I feel forced myself. Little as I know of Captain Brown, I would fain do my part to correct the tone and the statements of the newspapers, and of my countrymen generally, respecting his character and actions. It costs us nothing to be just. We can at least express our sympathy with, and admiration of, him and his companions, and that is what I now... more...