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Showing: 1761-1769 results of 1769

GEORGE BORROWSELECTED PASSAGES It is very possible that the reader during his country walks or rides has observed, on coming to four cross-roads, two or three handfuls of grass lying at a small distance from each other down one of these roads; perhaps he may have supposed that this grass was recently plucked from the roadside by frolicsome children, and flung upon the ground in sport, and this may possibly have been the case; it is ten chances... more...

Preface. The Sleeping Bard was originally written in the Welsh language, and was published about the year 1720.  The author of it, Elis Wyn, was a clergyman of the Cambro Anglican Church, and a native of Denbighshire, in which county he passed the greater part of his life, at a place called Y las Ynys.  Besides the Sleeping Bard, he wrote and published a book in Welsh, consisting of advice to Christian Professors.  The above... more...

INTRODUCTION The Russians have three grand popular tales, the subjects of which are thievish adventures.  One is called the Story of Klim, another is called the Story of Tim, and the third is called the Story of Tom.  Below we present a translation of the Story of Tim. That part of the tale in which Tim inquires of the drowsy Archimandrite as to the person to whom the stolen pelisse is to be awarded, differs in no material point from... more...

THE WORLD'S FAIR; OR, CHILDREN'S PRIZE GIFT BOOK OF THE GREAT EXHIBITION.   What a pretty picture we have in the first title page, of the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park! This gigantic structure is built of iron, glass, and wood; but as, at a distance, it seems to be made entirely of glass, it is called the "Crystal Palace." Does it not look like one of those magnificent palaces we read about in fairy tales? The Great Exhibition is... more...

ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN WOODWARD AND FIVE SEAMEN IN THE ISLAND OF CELEBES. In the year 1791, Woodward sailed from Boston in the ship Robert Morris, Captain Hay, for the East Indies. On his arrival there he was employed in making country voyages until the 20th of January, when he sailed as chief-mate in an American ship from Batavia bound to Manilla. In passing through the straits of Macassar, they found the wind and current both against them, and... more...


The Royal Oak   There is in Shropshire a fine oak-tree which the country people there call the "Royal Oak". They say it is the great-grandson, or perhaps the great-great-grandson of another fine old oak, which more than two hundred years ago stood on the same spot, and served once as a shelter to an English king. This king was Charles II, the son of the unlucky Charles I who had his head cut off by his subjects because he was a weak and... more...

Look at this young ensign, how fine he looks with his banner and his sword. Wouldn’t you like to be a soldier? to fight for your country?   This soldier has got leave of absence for a few days, and has joined a party of hunters. Here he is with his horn, whip, cap, and dog.   Here is an old Turkish officer, who is just going to fight; see he has drawn his sabre, and is holding out his shield to defend himself.   This is... more...

CHAPTER I SPEECH Importance of Speech. There never has been in the history of the world a time when the spoken word has been equaled in value and importance by any other means of communication. If one traces the development of mankind from what he considers its earliest stage he will find that the wandering family of savages depended entirely upon what its members said to one another. A little later when a group of families made a clan or tribe... more...

INTRODUCTION AIMS AND PURPOSES OF SPEAKING It is obvious that the style of your public speaking will depend upon the specific purpose you have in view. If you have important truths which you wish to make known, or a great and definite cause to serve, you are likely to speak about it with earnestness and probably with eloquence. If, however, your purpose in speaking is a selfish one—if your object is self-exploitation, or to serve some... more...