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Showing: 41-50 results of 1892

STORY I BUDDY PIGG IN A CABBAGE Once upon a time, not so many years ago, in fact it was about the same year that Jackie and Peetie Bow Wow, the little puppy dog boys lived in their kennel house, there used to play with them, two queer little brown and white and black and white animal children, called guinea pigs. They were just as cute as they could be, and, since I have told you some stories about rabbits, and squirrels and ducks, as well as... more...

STORY IWHERE BUMPER CAME FROM There was once an old woman who had so many rabbits that she hardly knew what to do. They ate her out of house and home, and kept the cupboard so bare she often had to go to bed hungry. But none of the rabbits suffered this way. They all had their supper, and their breakfast, too, even if there wasn't a crust left in the old woman's cupboard. There were big rabbits and little rabbits; lean ones and fat ones;... more...

CHAPTER I A MIDNIGHT ALARM "Bunny! Bunny Brown! Sue, dear! Aren't you going to get up?" Mrs. Brown stood in the hall, calling to her two sleeping children. The sun was shining brightly out of doors, but the little folks had not yet gotten out of bed. "My! But you are sleeping late this morning!" went on Mrs. Brown. "Come, Bunny! Sue! It's time for breakfast!" There was a patter of bare feet in one room. Then a little voice called. "Oh,... more...

CHAPTER I GRANDPA'S TENT "Bunny! Bunny Brown! There's a wagon stoppin' in front of our house!" "Is there? What kind of a wagon is it, Sue?" The little girl, who had called to her brother about the wagon, stood with her nose pressed flat against the glass of the window, looking out to where the rain was beating down on the green grass of the front yard. Bunny Brown, who had been playing with a tin locomotive that ran on a tiny tin track, put... more...

CHAPTER I A GRAND CRASH Patter, patter, patter came the rain drops, not only on the roof, but all over, out of doors, splashing here and there, making little fountains in every mud puddle. Bunny Brown and his sister Sue stood with their faces pressed against the windows, looking out into the summer storm. "I can make my nose flatter'n you can!" suddenly exclaimed Bunny. "Oh, you cannot!" disputed Sue. "Look at mine!" She thrust her nose... more...


CHAPTER I THE BOY NEXT DOOR "Oh, mother!" cried Bunny Brown, running up the front steps as he reached home from school. "Oh, something's happened next door!" "What do you mean, Bunny? A fire?" "No, it isn't a fire," said Sue, who was as much out of breath as was her brother. "It's sumfin different from that!" "But, children, what do you mean? Is some one hurt?" asked Mrs. Brown. "It sounds so," answered Bunny, putting his books on the... more...

CHAPTER I BUNNY IS UPSIDE DOWN "Grandpa, where are you going now?" asked Bunny Brown. "And what are you going to do?" asked Bunny Brown's sister Sue. Grandpa Brown, who was walking down the path at the side of the farmhouse, with a basket on his arm, stood and looked at the two children. He smiled at them, and Bunny and Sue smiled back, for they liked Grandpa Brown very much, and he just loved them. "Are you going after the eggs?" asked Sue.... more...

How I made my Plans and they were Endorsed. “Now, Master Joseph, do adone now, do. I’m sure your poor dear eyes’ll go afore you’re forty, and think of that!” “Bother!” “What say, my dear?” “Don’t bother.” “You’re always running your finger over that map thing, my dear. I can’t abear to see it.” Nurse Brown looked over the top of her spectacles at... more...

CHAPTER I. AT HOME. On the evening of a dismal, rainy day in spring, a mother and her son were sitting in their log-cabin home in the southern portion of the present State of Missouri. The settlement bore the name of Martinsville, in honor of the leader of the little party of pioneers who had left Kentucky some months before, and, crossing the Mississippi, located in that portion of the vast territory known at that time as Louisiana. There... more...

CHAPTER I JOHN O'NEILL'S LEGACY "Queer, isn't it?" Jim said. "Rather!" said Wally. They were sitting on little green chairs in Hyde Park. Not far off swirled the traffic of Piccadilly; glancing across to Hyde Park Corner, they could see the great red motor-'buses, meeting, halting, and then rocking away in different directions, hooting as they fled. The roar of London was in their ears. It was a sunny morning in September. The Park was... more...