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Showing: 1-10 results of 13

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTORY § 1. Logic is the science that explains what conditions must be fulfilled in order that a proposition may be proved, if it admits of proof. Not, indeed, every such proposition; for as to those that declare the equality or inequality of numbers or other magnitudes, to explain the conditions of their proof belongs to Mathematics: they are said to be quantitative. But as to all other propositions, called qualitative,... more...


❧ The Translator to the Reader. Here is (gentle Reader) nothing (the word of God onely set apart) which so much beautifieth and adorneth the soule and minde of mã, as doth the knowledge of good artes and sciences: as the knowledge of naturall and morall Philosophie. The one setteth before our eyes, the creatures of God, both in the heauens aboue, and in the earth beneath: in which as in a glasse, we beholde the exceding maiestie and... more...

Oh, why should I be doomed to the degradation of bearing such a foolish appellation! A Girtham Girl! I suppose we have to thank that fiend of invention who is responsible for most of the titular foibles and follies of mankind—artful Alliteration. The two G’s, people imagine, run so well together; and it is wonderful that they do not append some other delectable title, such as ‘The Gushing Girl of Girtham,’ or ‘The... more...

by Unknown
Socrates: Well, here we are at the appointed time, Meno. Meno: Yes, and it looks like a fine day for it, too. Socrates: And I see our serving boy is also here. Boy: Yes, I am, and ready to do your bidding. Socrates: Wonderful. Now, Meno, I want you to be on your guard, as you were the other day, to insure that I teach nothing to the boy, but rather pull out of his mind the premises which are already there. Meno: I shall do my best, Socrates.... more...


by Unknown
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SIR, Your acquaintance with the Author before his death was not long, which I have oft heard you say, you counted your great unhappinesse, but within a short time after, you knew not well whether to count your selfe more happie in that you once knew him, or unhappy in that upon your acquaintance you so suddenly lost him. This his worke then being to come forth to the censorious eye of the world, and as the manner usually is to have some... more...

EXCELSIOR. "Goblin, lead them up and down." The ruddy glow of sunset was already fading into the sombre shadows of night, when two travellers might have been observed swiftly—at a pace of six miles in the hour—descending the rugged side of a mountain; the younger bounding from crag to crag with the agility of a fawn, while his companion, whose aged limbs seemed ill at ease in the heavy chain armour habitually worn by tourists in... more...