Showing: 21-30 results of 1769

FOREWORD. Every summer there is demand for illustrated literature describing the mountain variously called "Rainier" or "Tacoma." Hitherto, we have had only small collections of pictures, without text, and confined to the familiar south and southwest sides. The little book which I now offer aims to show the grandest and most accessible of our extinct volcanoes from all points of view. Like the glacial rivers, its text will be found a narrow... more...

“I would not have you to be ignorant, brethren, concerning them which are asleep.”—1 Thess. iv. 13. There are moments in the lives of every one of us, when the mind is irresistibly drawn on to wonder what our own personal future shall be, as soon as life is over and death has overtaken us.  We cannot help the speculation.  However bound by present duties and absorbed in present interests, often, in quiet hours, in... more...

Preface When I first saw Mr. Osgood's beautiful illustrated edition of The Lady of the Lake, I asked him to let me use some of the cuts in a cheaper annotated edition for school and household use; and the present volume is the result. The text of the poem has given me unexpected trouble. When I edited some of Gray's poems several years ago, I found that they had not been correctly printed for more than half a century; but in the case of Scott I... more...

I. Man’s Place in Nature, as affected by the Copernican Theory.   When we study the Divine Comedy of Dante—that wonderful book wherein all the knowledge and speculation, all the sorrows and yearnings, of the far-off Middle Ages are enshrined in the glory of imperishable verse—we are brought face to face with a theory of the world and with ways of reasoning about the facts of nature which seem strange to us to-day, but... more...

The Communist Threat in the Taiwan Area 1. Statement by Secretary Dulles,September 4, 1958   I have reviewed in detail with the President the serious situation which has resulted from aggressive Chinese Communist military actions in the Taiwan (Formosa) Straits area. The President has authorized me to make the following statement. 1. Neither Taiwan (Formosa) nor the islands of Quemoy and Matsu have ever been under the authority of the... more...


I.—Silverhorns By Henry van Dyke THE railway station of Bathurst, New Brunswick, did not look particularly merry at two o'clock of a late September morning. There was an easterly haze driving in from the Baie des Chaleurs and the darkness was so saturated with chilly moisture that an honest downpour of rain would have been a relief. Two or three depressed and somnolent travelers yawned in the waiting room, which smelled horribly of smoky... more...

THE BOY'SBOOK OF BALLADS. Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne.    When shaws be sheen, and swards full fair,And leaves both large and long,It is merry walking in the fair forestTo hear the small birds' song. The woodweel sang, and would not cease,Sitting upon the spray,So loud, he wakened Robin Hood,In the greenwood where he lay. Now by my faith, said jolly Robin,A sweaven I had this night;I dreamt me of two wight yeomenThat fast... more...

he idea of a machine-made watch with interchangeable parts had been in the minds of many men for a long time. Several attempts had been made to translate this conception into a reality. Success crowned the efforts of those working near Boston, Massachusetts, in the 1850’s. The work done there formed the basis on which American watch making grew to such a point that by the 1870’s watches of domestic manufacture had captured nearly all... more...

INTRODUCTION THE accompanying Atlas has been included in this series for the greater convenience of the reader of “Grote's Greece” and other works that ask a continual reference to maps of ancient and classical geography. The disadvantage of having to turn perpetually from the text of a volume to a map at its end, or a few pages away, is often enough to prevent the effective use of the one in elucidating the other. Despite some... more...

TOOLS AND MATERIALS The art of taxidermy, with its many methods of application, has furnished subject-matter for numerous books, most of these treating the subject in exhaustive style, being written primarily for students who desire to take up the work as a profession. It is the present author's purpose to set forth herein a series of practical methods suited to the needs of the sportsman-amateur who desires personally to preserve trophies and... more...