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PREFACE As in the case of "The Bases of Design," to which this is intended to form a companion volume, the substance of the following chapters on Line and Form originally formed a series of lectures delivered to the students of the Manchester Municipal School of Art. There is no pretension to an exhaustive treatment of a subject it would be difficult enough to exhaust, and it is dealt with in a way intended to bear rather upon the practical... more...

CHAPTER I. MADEMOISELLE JEANNE. "Maitre Corbeau, sur un arbre perché." La Fontaine. It was so cold. Ah, so very cold! So thought the old raven as he hobbled up and down the terrace walk at the back of the house—the walk that was so pleasant in summer, with its pretty view of the lower garden, gay with the bright, stiffly-arranged flowerbeds, so pleasantly warm and yet shady with the old trees overhead, where the raven's... more...

PRINCESS BELLE-ETOILE. Once upon a time there were three Princesses, named Roussette, Brunette, and Blondine, who lived in retirement with their mother, a Princess who had lost all her former grandeur. One day an old woman called and asked for a dinner, as this Princess was an excellent cook. After the meal was over, the old woman, who was a fairy, promised that their kindness should be rewarded, and immediately disappeared. Shortly after, the... more...

THE SLEEPING BEAUTY.   Long, long ago, in ancient times, there lived a King and Queen,And for the blessing of a child their longing sore had been:At last, a little daughter fair, to their great joy, was given,And to the christening feast they made, they bade the Fairies seven—   The Fairies seven, who loved the land—that they the child might bless,Yet one old Fairy they left out, in pure forgetfulness.And at the... more...

CHAPTER I THE PARLOUR BEHIND THE SHOP 'I was very solitary indeed.' (Visit to the Cousins).—Mary Lamb. The blinds had been drawn down for some time in the back parlour behind Mr. Fairchild's shop in Pier Street, the principal street in the little town of Seacove. And the gas was lighted, though it was not turned up very high. It was a great thing to have gas; it had not been known at Seacove till recently. For the time of... more...


THE FROG PRINCE. IN the olden time, when wishing was having, there lived a King, whose daughters were all beautiful; but the youngest was so exceedingly beautiful that the Sun himself, although he saw her very often, was enchanted every time she came out into the sunshine. Near the castle of this King was a large and gloomy forest, and in the midst stood an old lime-tree, beneath whose branches splashed a little fountain; so, whenever it was... more...

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GIRLS AND BOYS [Listen] [PDF] [MusicXML]   1. Girls and boys come out to play,The moon doth shine as bright as day;Leave your supper, and leave your sleep;Come to your playfellows in the street;2. Come with a whoop, and come with a call.Come with a good will or not at all.Up the ladder and down the wall,A penny loaf will serve you all. THE MVLBERRY BVSH [Listen] [PDF] [MusicXML]   Here we go round the mulberry... more...

FOUR YEARS OLD "I was four yesterday; when I'm quite old I'll have a cricket-ball made of pure gold; I'll never stand up to show that I'm grown; I'll go at liberty upstairs or down." He trotted upstairs. Perhaps trotting is not quite the right word, but I can't find a better. It wasn't at all like a horse or pony trotting, for he went one foot at a time, right foot first, and when right foot was safely landed on a step, up came... more...

A for the APPLEor Alphabet pie,Which all get a slice of.Come taste it & try. B is the BABYwho gave Mr BuntingFull many a long day'srabbit skin hunting. C for the CATthat played on the fiddle,When cows jumped higher than'Heigh Diddle Diddle!' D for the DAMEwith her pig at the stile,'Tis said they got over,but not yet a while.   E for the Englishman,ready to make fastThe giant who wanted tohave him for... more...