I.  PICTURES, SKETCHES AND DRAWINGSBY OR RELATING TO SAMUEL BUTLER By his will Butler bequeathed his pictures, sketches, and studies to his executors to be destroyed or otherwise disposed of as they might think best, the proceeds (if any) to fall into residue.  They were not sold: some were given to Shrewsbury School; some to the British Museum; one, an unfinished sketch of the back of the house in which Keats died on the Piazza di... more...

CHAPTER I The ancient port of Sunwich was basking in the sunshine of a July afternoon. A rattle of cranes and winches sounded from the shipping in the harbour, but the town itself was half asleep. Somnolent shopkeepers in dim back parlours coyly veiled their faces in red handkerchiefs from the too ardent flies, while small boys left in charge noticed listlessly the slow passing of time as recorded by the church clock. It is a fine church, and... more...

PREFACE The following pages are designed to give a historical and critical account of all that has been done in the way of translating Beowulf from the earliest attempts of Sharon Turner in 1805 down to the present time. As a corollary to this, it presents a history of the text of the poem to the time of the publication of Grein’s Bibliothek der angelsächsischen Poesie in 1859; for until the publication of this work every editor of... more...

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Importance of a study of Scott's critical and scholarly work—Connection between his creative work and his criticism—Chronological view of his literary career. Scott's critical work has become inconspicuous because of his predominant fame as an imaginative writer; but what it loses on this account it perhaps gains in the special interest attaching to criticism formulated by a great creative artist. One phase... more...

by Various
A. Abbey of St. Wandrille, 382. 486.Abdication of James II., 39. 489.Aberdeen, Burnet prize at, 91.Aboriginal chambers near Tilbury, 462.A.(B) on emancipation of the Jews, 475.Accuracy of references, 170.Addison's books, 212.Adolphus on a recent novel, 231.Advent bells, 121.Adversaria, 73. 86.Aelfric's colloquy, 168. 197. 232. 248. 278.Aelian, translation of, 267. 284.A.(F.R.) on Sterne's Koran, 418.—— on a passage in Goldsmith,... more...


A Bit of His Life Talbot Mundy was born in London on April 23, 1879. He was educated at Rugby, and served nearly ten years, beginning in 1900, as a government official in Africa and India. While in India, he wandered all over the sub-continent on horseback, and even into Tibet. Eastern occult lore first attracted, then fascinated, his active and unorthodox mind. Mundy absorbed all he could learn of the Indian beliefs. Government service next... more...

A Preface With Some Revised Ideas IT HAS BEEN ten years since I wrote the prefatory "Declaration" to this now enlarged and altered book. Not to my generation alone have many things receded during that decade. To the intelligent young as well as to the intelligent elderly, efforts in the present atmosphere to opiate the public with mere pictures of frontier enterprise have a ghastly unreality. The Texas Rangers have come to seem as remote as the... more...

Preface to the Second Edition This index was begun as a card index to the debaters' manuals in the Reference Department of this Library. The increasing number of such manuals and the frequent requests for material on debates made it seem desirable to combine in one list the indexes to all the manuals, thus bringing references to all the material on one subject together and saving the time required to consult the index of each book. The card... more...

My dear Dr. Corson, I waited some days after the arrival of your Book and Letter, thinking I might be able to say more of my sense of your goodness: but I can do no more now than a week ago. You "hope I shall not find too much to disapprove of": what I ought to protest against, is "a load to sink a navy—too much honor": how can I put aside your generosity, as if cold justice—however befitting myself— would be in better... more...

I. INTRODUCTORY GROUP. "PAULINE," "PARACELSUS," "SORDELLO." These three poems are Mr. Browning's first, and they are also, as I have said, the one partial exception to the unity and continuousness of his work; they have, at least, one common characteristic which detaches them from the remainder of it. Each is in its different way the study of a human spirit, too ambitious to submit to the limits of human existence, and which learns humility... more...