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THE REPRODUCTION OF LIVING BEINGS History of the Germ:—Cell-division—Parthenogenesis—Conjugation—Mneme—Embryological Development— Difference of the Sexes—Castration—Hermaphrodism— Heredity—Blastophthoria. A general law of organic life decrees that every living individual is gradually transformed in the course of a cycle which is called individual life, and which terminates with... more...

CHAPTER I THE PROBLEM DEFINED What is sex? Asexual and mixed reproduction; Origin of sexual reproduction; Advantage of sex in chance of survival; Germ and body cells; Limitations of biology in social problems; Sex always present in higher animals; Sex in mammals; The sex problem in the human species; Application of laboratory method. Sex, like all complicated phenomena, defies being crowded into a simple definition. In an animal or... more...

PREFACE It has always seemed to me a particular duty of the psychologist from time to time to leave his laboratory and with his little contribution to serve the outside interests of the community. Our practical life is filled with psychological problems which have to be solved somehow, and if everything is left to commonsense and to unscientific fancies about the mind, confusion must result, and the psychologist who stands aloof will be to... more...

CHAPTER IATTAINMENT OF MIND CONTROL The Man of Tomorrow The men of the nineteenth century have harnessed the forces of the outer world. The age is now at hand that shall harness the energies of mind, new-found in the psychological laboratory, and shall put them at the service of humanity. Are you fully equipped to take a valiant part in the work of the coming years? The Dollars and Cents of Mental Waste The greatest of all eras is at hand!... more...

Chapter I MENTAL SECOND WIND Sticking to the Job Are you an unusually persevering and persistent person? Or, like most of us, do you sometimes find it difficult to stick to the job until it is done? What is your usual experience in this respect? Is it not this, that you work steadily along until of a sudden you become conscious of a feeling of weariness, crying "Enough!" for the time being, and that you then yield to the impulse to stop? The... more...


Inferences from Haunted Houses and Haunted Men The lack of interest in so-called psychical matters is somewhat surprising. There is, however, more hope of the clearing up of the scientific aspects of these phenomena than ever before. Sir William Crookes, late President of the British Association, has no doubt that thoughts and images may be transferred from one mind to another without the agency of the recognised organs of sense, and that... more...

INTRODUCTION From the point of view of literature, the Great War of to-day has brought us into a new and closer sympathy with the England of the past. Dr. Woods and Mr. Baltzly in their recent careful study of European Warfare, Is War Diminishing? come to the conclusion that England during the period of her great activity in the world has been "fighting about half the time." We had begun to look on war as belonging to the past and insensibly... more...

Chapter I THE TWO FUNDAMENTAL PROCESSES OF MIND Mind as a Means to Achievement In the preceding book, "Psychology and Achievement," we established the truth of two propositions: I. All human achievement comes about through bodily activity. II. All bodily activity is caused, controlled and directed by the mind. To these two fundamental propositions we now append a third, which needs no proof, but follows as a natural and logical conclusion... more...

CHAPTER IWHAT IS PSYCHOLOGY? Wise men study the sciences which deal with the origins and development of animal life, with the structure of the cells, with the effect of various diseases upon the tissues and fluids of the body; they study the causes of the reactions of the body cells to disease germs, and search for the origin and means of extermination of these enemies to health. They study the laws of physical well-being. They seek for the... more...

A DOMINIE IN DOUBT I. "Just give me your candid opinion of A Dominie's Log; I'd like to hear it." Macdonald looked up from digging into the bowl of his pipe with a dilapidated penknife. He is now head-master of Tarbonny Public School, a school I know well, for I taught in it for two years as an ex-pupil teacher. Six days ago he wrote asking me to come and spend a holiday with him, so I hastily packed my bag and made for Euston. This evening... more...