Showing: 1-10 results of 1453

by Various
Simeon Ponsonby—the professor of botany at Harmouth—had married when over forty the eldest daughter of a distinguished though impecunious family in his own college town. His mother, on her deathbed, foresaw that he would need a housekeeper and suggested the match. "Simeon," she said, "it isn't for us to question the Lord's ways, but I am mortally sorry to leave you, my son; it is hard for a man to shift for himself. I was thinking... more...

Through the glamour of the Colonial we are forced to acknowledge the classic charm shown in late seventeenth and early eighteenth century window designs. Developed, as they were, by American carpenters who were stimulated by remembrance of their early impressions of English architecture received in the mother land, there is no precise or spiritless copy of English details; rather there is expressed a vitality that has been brought out by earnest... more...

The Garden in October October is a fine time to plant every kind of "bulb, root and tuber," also all deciduous plants and shrubs, except those with thin bark or thick, fleshy roots (e.g., birch magnolia). Clean up and burn diseased plants, manure the garden, plow it and leave it all winter. Burn asparagus tops and manure the bed. Also make new asparagus and rhubarb beds and plant sets of extra early pearl onions for use next March. Put... more...

by Various
THE ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK.   HIS is an American bird, and has been described under various names by various authors. It is found in the lower parts of Pennsylvania, in the state of New York, and in New England, particularly in autumn, when the berries of the sour gum are ripe, on the kernels of which it eagerly feeds. As a singer it has few superiors. It frequently sings at night, and even all night, the notes being extremely clear and... more...

Psychometry: The Divine Science. It is presumed that every reader of these pages has some knowledge of this subject, either by reading the “Manual of Psychometry” or otherwise, and has at least read the “Introduction to the Journal of Man” on our cover pages. It is not of the directly practical bearings of Psychometry that I would speak at present, but of its imperial rank among sciences, entitling it to the post of... more...


Creation’s Mysteries Dr. B. Cyriax, editor of the Spiritualistische Blätter, published at Liepsic, Ger., has given in the issue of March 31st the following communications from Dr. Hahnemann and Dr. Spurzheim, delivered through a trance medium. They are valuable essays, whatever may be their source, and the reader will not fail to observe their general coincidence with the doctrine presented by myself in the May number of the Journal... more...

The World’s Neglected or Forgotten Leaders and Pioneers. Leif Ericson, the long-forgotten Scandinavian discoverer of North America, nearly five hundred years before Columbus, has at last received American justice, and a statue in his honor has been erected, which was unveiled in Boston, on Commonwealth Avenue, before a distinguished assemblage, on the 29th of October. The history of the Scandinavian discovery and settlement was related on... more...

Published from 1849 to 1856 at Cincinnati, is to be re-established at Boston in February, 1887. When published formerly it was in its character and merits entirely unique, and, notwithstanding the progress of thirty-five years, its position is still unique, and in its essential characteristics different from all nineteenth century literature, and not in competition with any other publication. It was needed in 1849, and it is still more needed... more...

The Pursuit of Truth. “To be loyal to the truth is of more account than to be merely successful in formulating it.”—Popular Science Monthly for December. Indeed it is; for loyalty to truth is the prior condition of success in formulating or stating it, and that loyalty not only precedes the special success in formulating it, but is the prior cause of universal success in its attainment. Special perceptive powers and... more...

The Most Marvellous Triumph of Educational Science. In the dull atmosphere which stagnates between the high walls of colleges and churches wherein play the little eddies of fashionable literature, which considers the authorship of an old play more interesting and important than the questions that involve the welfare of all humanity or the destiny of a nation,—an atmosphere seldom stirred by the strong, pure breezes of the mountain and the... more...