Showing: 31-40 results of 1453

by Various
THE DOG WHO LOST HIS MASTER pot was a little dog who had come all the way from Chicago to Boston, in the cars with his master. But, as they were about to take the cars back to their home, they entered a shop near the railroad-station; and there, before Spot could get out to follow his master, a bad boy shut the door, and kept the poor dog a prisoner. The cars were just going to start. In vain did the master call "Spot, Spot!" In vain did poor... more...

by Various
OUR CHRISTMAS PLAY. Our Emily wrote a play for our Christmas entertainment. Emily, Ruth, Mary, and Uncle Peter, all took part in it. The curtain fell amid very great applause from grandma, grandpa, father, and Uncle Charles, Brothers Robert and John, Jane, the housemaid, Aunt Alice, and some six of our cousins. So you see we had a good audience. As it is the only play we have ever seen acted, we may be too partial critics; but readers must judge... more...

by Various
INTRODUCED TO THE ATLANTIC OCEAN.   OW for it, girls! Let me introduce you to the Atlantic Ocean! Mr. Ocean, these are my three cousins from Kentucky: Miss Jenny, Miss Eva, and Miss Kate Logan. They never saw you till today. This lady on my left is my sister, Miss Dora Drake, the best swimmer at Brant Rock Beach; but her you know already, also my dog Andy." "Oh! I don't want to go any further. I'm afraid of the Atlantic Ocean," cried... more...

by Various
THE QUEER THINGS THAT HAPPENED TO NELLY.   ELLY BURTON had been weeding in the garden nearly all the summer forenoon; and she was quite tired out. "Oh, if I could only be dressed up in fine clothes, and not have to work!" thought she. No sooner had the thought passed through her mind, than, as she looked down on the closely-mown grass by the edge of the pond, she saw the queerest sight that child ever beheld. A carriage, the body of... more...

by Various
THE PARROT THAT PLAYED TRUANT.   LD Miss Dorothy Draper had a parrot. It was one of the few things she loved. And the parrot seemed to love her in return. Miss Dorothy would hang the cage outside of her window every sunny day. Sometimes an idle boy would come along, and poke a stick between the wires; and then the old lady would say, "Boy, go away!" But one day, when the window was open, and the door of the cage was open also, Polly... more...


by Various
THREADING THE NEEDLE.   HERE is Lucy all this while?" asked Mrs. Ludlow of Anna, the maid. "I left her five minutes ago, trying to thread a needle," replied Anna. "She is a long while about it," said Mrs. Ludlow. "Send her to me." When Lucy entered the room, her mother asked her what she had been about; and Lucy replied, "I have been teaching myself to thread a needle." "But you have been a long time about it," said mother. "I will... more...

by Various
THE LITTLE TEACHER. I know of a little girl, who, like Mozart, shows a great talent for music, though she is not yet ten years old. Before she could walk, it seemed to be her delight to creep along the floor to the piano, draw herself up so as to touch the key-board, and then strike the different keys. Some of the sounds were pleasing to her, and from some she would start and draw back, as if she were hurt. A false note in music seemed to... more...

by Various
STEERING FOR HOME.   LOW, thou bitter northern gale;Heave, thou rolling, foaming sea;Bend the mast and fill the sail,Let the gallant ship go free!Steady, lad! Be firm and steady!On the compass fix your eye;Ever watchful, ever ready,Let the rain and spray go by!We're steering for home.Let the waves with angry thudShake the ship from stem to stern;We can brave the flying scud,It may go, it may return:In the wind are cheerful voices,In the... more...

by Various
THE AUNT AND THE NIECE.   UNT RUTH was only nine years old, while her niece Mary was nineteen. But Ruth, being an aunt, felt she must keep up the dignity of one; and so she used to treat Mary as if Mary were a little girl. They had not seen each other for nearly a year; and, when they met, Mary, who was fond of mischief, acted as if she were really younger than Ruth, though she well knew she was nine years older. "Aunt Ruth," said Mary,... more...

by Various
WHAT THE PAPERS SAY OF IT. If you would teach your child to read in the easiest, quickest, and most practicable way, easiest both to the child and the teacher, put "The Nursery" in its hands every month. Our word for it, you will be surprised at the result. "The Nursery" will be found a primer, a reading-book, drawing-book, story-book, and lesson-book, all in one.—Boston Transcript. "The Nursery" is as great a favorite as ever; and all... more...