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It was a terrific storm. The wind swept down the river, raising a ridge of white water in its path. The rain came down harder, so the boys thought, than they had ever seen it come down before, and the glare of the lightning and the crash of the thunder were frightful. "What luck it is that we got the tent pitched in time!" exclaimed Joe. "We're as dry and comfortable here as if we were in a house." "Pick your blankets up quick, boys," cried... more...

by Various
BABY, BEE, AND BUTTERFLY. BY MARY D. BRINE.   aby, Bee, and Butterfly,Underneath the summer sky.Baby, bees, and birds together,Happy in the pleasant weather;Sunshine over all around,In the sky, and on the ground;Hiding, too, in Baby's eyes,As he looks in mute surpriseAt the sunbeams tumbling overMerrily amid the clover,Where the bees, at work all day,Never find the time for play.Happy little baby boy!Tiny heart all full of joy;Loving... more...

President's Greeting, Annual Meeting, 1915. THOS. E. CASHMAN, PRESIDENT. This is the forty-ninth annual meeting of the Minnesota State Horticultural Society. Nearly half a century has elapsed since that little band of pioneers met in Rochester and organized that they might work out a problem that had proven too difficult for any of them to handle single handed and alone. Those men were all anxious to raise at least sufficient fruit for... more...

~With Discussion by Messrs. Allen Hazen, George A. Johnson,Morris Knowles, George C. Whipple, F. F. Longley, and E. D. Hardy.~ The Washington filtration plant has already been fully described.[2] At the time that paper was written (November, 1906), the filtration plant had been in operation for only about 1 year. It has now been in continuous operation for 5 years, and many data on the cost, efficiency, and methods of operation, have accumulated... more...

TESTS OF CREOSOTED TIMBER. By W. B. Gregory, M. Am. Soc. C. E. During the last few years a quantity of literature has appeared in which the treatment of timber by preservatives has been discussed. The properties of timber, both treated and untreated, have been determined by the Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture, and through its researches valuable knowledge has come to engineers who have to deal with the design of... more...


With Discussion by Messrs. William Arthur Payne, and Eugene Klapp. A private yacht pier, built near Glen Cove, Long Island, has brought out a few points which may be of interest. It is an example of a small engineering structure, which, though of no great moment in itself, illustrates the adoption of means to an end that may be capable of very great extension. The problem, as submitted to the writer, was to construct a yacht landing at East... more...

In the location of new railways and the improvement of lines already in operation, it is now well recognized that large economies can be effected by the careful study of train resistance due to grades and alignment, distributing this resistance so as to secure a minimum cost of operation with the means available for construction. While engaged in such studies some years ago, the attention of the writer was attracted by the fact that the usual... more...

by Various
FINAL REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON RAIL SECTIONS. Your Special Committee on Steel Rails, since their appointment in 1902, have held numerous meetings, not only of their own body, but also in conference with Committees representing other Societies and the steel rail makers. The results of their deliberations have been presented to the Society in their reports presented on— January 21st, 1903 " 18th, 1905 " 17th,... more...

Introduction. The mine disaster, which occurred at Cherry, Ill., on November 13th, 1909, when 527 men were in the mine, resulting in the entombment of 330 men, of whom 310 were killed, has again focused public attention on the frequent recurrence of such disasters and their appalling consequences. Interest in the possible prevention of such disasters, and the possible means of combating subsequent mine fires and rescuing the imprisoned miners,... more...

I know that to some of my audience a satisfactory address at a summer convention would be like that which many people regard as a satisfactory sermon—something soothing and convincing, to the effect that you are not as other men are, but better. While I appreciate very fully, however, the honor of being able to address you, I am going to look trouble in the face in an effort to convince you that, in spite of great individual achievements,... more...