Showing: 11-20 results of 1453

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HANOVER TERRACE, REGENT'S PARK.   "The architectural spirit which has arisen in London since the late peace, and ramified from thence to every city and town of the empire, will present an era in our domestic history." Such is the opinion of an intelligent writer in a recent number of Brande's "Quarterly Journal;" and he goes on to describe the new erections in the Regent's Park as the "dawning of a new and better taste, and in comparison... more...

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EXETER 'CHANGE, STRAND.   Who has not heard of Exeter 'Change? celebrated all over England for its menagerie and merchandize—wild beasts and cutlery—kangaroos and fleecy hosiery—elephants and minikin pins—a strange assemblage of nature and art—and savage and polished life. At page 69 of the present volume we have given a brief sketch of the "Ancient Site of the Exeter 'Change," &c.; showing how the... more...

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MERCERS' HALL, AND CHEAPSIDE   The engraving is an interesting illustration of the architecture of the metropolis in the seventeenth century, independent of its local association with names illustrious in historical record. In former times, when persons of the same trade congregated together in some particular street, the mercers principally assembled in West Cheap, now called Cheapside, near where the above hall stands, and thence called... more...

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POPE'S TEMPLE, AT HAGLEY   Reader! are you going out of town "in search of the picturesque"—if so, bend your course to the classic, the consecrated ground of HAGLEY! think of LYTTLETON, POPE, SHENSTONE, and THOMSON, or refresh your memory from the "Spring" of the latter, as— Courting the muse, thro' Hagley Park thou strayst. Thy British Tempe! There along the dale, With woods o'erhung, and shagg'd with mossy rocks, Whence... more...

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Loch Goil Head   AND RESIDENCE OF CAMPBELL, THE POET. The Engraving represents Loch Goil Head, a small village in Argyleshire, as it name imports, at the end of Loch Goil. It is an exquisite vignette, of Alpine sublimity, and is rendered extremely interesting as the residence of Thomas Campbell, Esq. author of the "Pleasures of Hope," &c. and one of the most celebrated of British poets. His château, or retreat, is represented on... more...


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ST. PETER'S CHURCH, PIMLICO.   The engraving represents the new church on the eastern side of Wilton Place, in the Parish of St. George, Hanover Square. It is a chaste building of the Ionic order, from the designs of Mr. Henry Hakewill, of whose architectural attainments we have frequently had occasion to speak. The plan of St. Peter's is a parallelogram, placed east and west, without aisles; the east being increased by the addition of a... more...

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OLD SARUM   Among the earliest antiquarian records, Old Sarum is described as a city of the Belgae; and its historical details have proved an exhaustless mine for the researches of topographical illustrators. Thus, Sir R.C. Hoare describes it as "a city of high note in the remotest periods by the several barrows near it, and its proximity to the two largest Druidical temples in England, namely, Stonehenge and Abury." "Ancient... more...

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THE FUGITIVE. A SCOTCH TALE. (For the Mirror.) It was now abute the gloaming when my ain same Janet (heav'n sain her saul) was sitting sae bieldy in a bit neuk ayant the ingle, while the winsome weans gathering around their minnie were listing till some auld spae wife's tale o' ghaists and worriecows; when on a sudden some ane tirled at the door pin. "Here's your daddie, bairns," said the gudewife ganging till the door; but i' place o' their... more...

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HISTORICAL FACTS RELATIVE TO THE EARLY CONDITION OF THE ENGLISH. (For the Mirror.) London, in early times (King Ethelred's reign) consisted only of scattered buildings from Ludgate to Westminster, and none where the heart of the city now is; it was afterwards extended more westward and continued increasing—-eastward being neglected until a more later period. Who can view its present well constructed houses, its numerous elegant squares... more...

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THE MANSION OF HIS GRACE THE DUKE OF WELLINGTON. The town mansions of our nobility are generally beneath all architectural criticism; and it has been pertinently observed that "an educated foreigner is quite astonished when shown the residences of our higher nobility and gentry in the British capital. He has heard speak of some great nobleman, with a revenue equal to that of a principality. He feels a curiosity to look at his palace, and he is... more...