Showing: 1-10 results of 40

INTRODUCTION. (11) The subject of Elocution, so far as it is deemed applicable to a work of this kind, will be considered under the following heads, viz: 1. ARTICULATION. 4. READING VERSE. 2. INFLECTION. 5. THE VOICE. 3. ACCENT AND EMPHASIS. 6. GESTURE. I. ARTICULATION. (11) Articulation is the utterance of the elementary sounds of a language, and of their combinations. As words consist of one or more elementary sounds, the first object of... more...

LESSON I. news'paper cold or'der seem through stock'ings chat sto'ry light Har'ry branch'es kiss burns Mrs. e vents' an oth'er Mr. stool lamp mends [Illustration: Family at evening; father reading newspaper, mother sewing, boy and girl reading.] EVENING AT HOME. 1. It is winter. The cold wind whistles through the branches of the trees. 2. Mr. Brown has done his day's work, and his children, Harry and Kate, have come home from school. They... more...

ECLECTIC EDUCATIONAL SERIES. MCGUFFEY'S (Registered)FOURTH ECLECTIC READER. REVISED EDITION. McGuffey Edition and Colophon are Trademarks of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. New York-Chichester-Weinheim-Brisbane-Toronto In revising the FOURTH READER, the aim has been—as it has with the other books of the Series—to preserve unimpaired all the essential characteristics of MCGUFFEY'S READERS. New articles have been substituted for old... more...

LESSON XXXV. fin'ished bon'net les'son saved white a way' I've am work scam'per read'y gar'den [Illustration: White kitten lapping milk from a bowl.] THE WHITE KITTEN. [Illustration: Script Exercise: Kitty, my pretty, white kitty.   Why do you scamper away?I've finished my work and my lesson   And now I am ready for play. Come, kitty, my own little kitty.   I've saved you some milk come and... more...

INTRODUCTION. 1. PRELIMINARY REMARKS. The great object to be accomplished in reading, as a rhetorical exercise, is to convey to the hearer, fully and clearly, the ideas and feelings of the writer. In order to do this, it is necessary that a selection should be carefully studied by the pupil before he attempts to read it. In accordance with this view, a preliminary rule of importance is the following: RULE 1.—Before attempting to read a... more...


LESSON XXVII. look go John here all wheel mill have round oo j Look! there are John and Sue by the mill pond. They like to see the big wheel go round. They have come to play on the logs and in the boat. John and Sue will play here all day. [Illustration: Script Exercise: The cows like grass. They stand in the shade. ] LESSON XXVIII. or Jane girls floor roll some which black o Here are some girls with skates; but they are not on the... more...

PREFACE Lest We Forget, the first volume of World War stories, gave an outline of the struggle up to the time of the signing of the armistice, November 11, 1918, and contained in general chronological order most of the stories that to children from ten to sixteen years of age would be of greatest interest, and give the clearest understanding of the titanic contest. This; the second volume of the same series, contains the stories of the war of... more...

VERSE AND PROSE FOR BEGINNERS IN READING. ALPHABET. A was an apple-pie;B bit it;C cut it;D dealt it;E ate it;F fought for it;G got it;H had it;J joined it;K kept it;L longed for it:M mourned for it;N nodded at it;O opened it;P peeped into it;Q quartered it;R ran for it;S stole it;T took it;V viewed it;W wanted it;X, Y, Z, and amperse-and,All wished for a piece in hand. A DEWDROP. Little drop of dew,  Like a gem you are;I believe... more...

I. TROY BEFORE THE SIEGE. Design by Burne-Jones. That part of Asia Minor which borders the narrow channel now known as the Dar-da-nellesГЉВ№, was in ancient times called TroГЉВ№as. Its capital was the city of Troy, which stood about three miles from the shore of the Æ-geГЉВ№an Sea, at the foot of Mount Ida, near the junction of two rivers, the SimГЉВ№o-is, and the Sca-manГЉВ№der or XanГЉВ№thus. The people of... more...

This elementary history of Greece is intended for supplementary reading or as a first history text-book for young pupils. It is therefore made up principally of stories about persons; for, while history proper is largely beyond the comprehension of children, they are able at an early age to understand and enjoy anecdotes of people, especially of those in the childhood of civilization. At the same time, these stories will give a clear idea of the... more...