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CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION. DESCRIPTION OF THE CHESS-BOARD AND MEN—ARRANGEMENT OF THE MEN—THE KING—THE QUEEN—THE ROOKS OR CASTLES—THE BISHOPS—THE KNIGHTS—AND THE PAWNS—THEIR MOVEMENTS, POWERS, METHOD OF CAPTURING AN ADVERSE MAN, ETC. DESCRIPTION OF THE CHESS-BOARD AND MEN. The game of Chess is played by two persons, each having at command a little army of sixteen men, upon a board divided into... more...

GAMES FOR HALLOW-E'EN Hallow-e'en or Hallow-Even is the last night of October, being the eve or vigil of All-Hallow's or All Saint's Day, and no holiday in all the year is so informal or so marked by fun both for grown-ups as well as children as this one. On this night there should be nothing but laughter, fun and mystery. It is the night when Fairies dance, Ghosts, Witches, Devils and mischief-making Elves wander around. It is the night when... more...

PREFACE. “What the child imitates,” says Froebel, “he begins to understand. Let him represent the flying of birds and he enters partially into the life of birds. Let him imitate the rapid motion of fishes in the water and his sympathy with fishes is quickened. Let him reproduce the activities of farmer, miller and baker, and his eyes open to the meaning of their work. In one word let him reflect in his play the varied aspects... more...

GOING SHOPPING A lively game of "talk and touch." The company is seated in a circle, and one who understands the game commences by saying to his neighbor at the right: "I have been shopping." "What did you buy?" is the required response. "A dress," "a book," "some flowers," "a pencil"—whatever the first speaker wishes, provided always that he can, in pronouncing the word, touch the object mentioned. Then the second player addresses his... more...

CHAPTER I First Principles: Endings, Middle-Game and Openings The first thing a student should do, is to familiarise himself with the power of the pieces. This can best be done by learning how to accomplish quickly some of the simple mates. 1. SOME SIMPLE MATES Example 1.—The ending Rook and King against King. The principle is to drive the opposing King to the last line on any side of the board.   In this position the power of... more...


PREFACE The present world war has given great impetus to the game of Chess. In the prison camps, in the field hospitals, in the training camps and even in the trenches Chess has become a favorite occupation in hours of leisure, not only because it offers a most fascinating pastime, but mainly because it serves beyond any doubt to develop what is now the most interesting study for every soldier—the grasp of the principles underlying... more...

In issuing this volume of my Mathematical Puzzles, of which some have appeared in periodicals and others are given here for the first time, I must acknowledge the encouragement that I have received from many unknown correspondents, at home and abroad, who have expressed a desire to have the problems in a collected form, with some of the solutions given at greater length than is possible in magazines and newspapers. Though I have included a few... more...

CHAPTER I. CHEVALIERS D'INDUSTRIE, OR POLITE SHARPERS. Chevaliers d'industrie, or polite and accomplished sharpers, have always existed in every city, from the earliest times to the present. The ordinary progress of these interesting gentlemen is as follows. Their debut is often difficult, and many of them are stopped short in their career. They only succeed by means of great exertion and severe trials; but they endure everything in order to be... more...

To the readers of the present generation much of this book will, doubtless, seem incredible. Still it is a book of facts—a section of our social history, which is, I think, worth writing, and deserving of meditation. Forty or fifty years ago—that is, within the memory of many a living man—gambling was 'the rage' in England, especially in the metropolis. Streets now meaningless and dull—such as Osendon Street, and streets... more...

INTRODUCTION Readers of The Mill on the Floss will remember that whenever Mr. Tulliver found himself confronted by any little difficulty he was accustomed to make the trite remark, "It's a puzzling world." There can be no denying the fact that we are surrounded on every hand by posers, some of which the intellect of man has mastered, and many of which may be said to be impossible of solution. Solomon himself, who may be supposed to have been as... more...